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‘The only way I know to survive this’: How a painting booth survived a tornado

BY MARK HARRIS/AP The tornado tore through a painting studio on a Texas highway.

A painter who was there in time to see the devastating storm was among the first to make it back home.

“You don’t expect to survive an tornado, but you know you’ve got to go back to get your stuff,” said the unidentified painter who gave his name only as Tom, who lives in a small, modest house in the town of Conroe, Texas, about 25 miles west of Houston.

“The only thing I know that can make it through a tornado is to go out there and make it,” Tom said. “

“It was pretty terrifying. “

The only thing I know that can make it through a tornado is to go out there and make it,” Tom said.

“It was pretty terrifying.

It felt like I was on the other side of the world.”

Tom, whose name has not been released, said he spent the day at a painting workshop with a friend and two of his children and a neighbor.

He said he took his dogs with him.

“When you’re in the tornado, you have to run,” Tom recalled.

“Even though I’m not really scared, I was thinking, ‘This is really going to hurt.

He took shelter in the garage of his small house with his two dogs and two cats, and was able to survive. “

The tornadoes were coming from east to west, but Tom said he could feel them coming from behind him.

He took shelter in the garage of his small house with his two dogs and two cats, and was able to survive.

He was able, however, to call for help from his neighbor, who ran out to help.”

I mean, this could have been anybody.” “

That was the best feeling in the world.

I mean, this could have been anybody.”

Tom was in the basement when the tornado tore in.

“There was a big cloud of smoke, and the house was shaking,” Tom remembered.

“My son was trying not to cry.

“By this time, the house started shaking again, and my dogs were screaming,” he said.””

It was like a tornado had come through, but there was no wind,” Tom added. “

By this time, the house started shaking again, and my dogs were screaming,” he said.

“It was like a tornado had come through, but there was no wind,” Tom added.

“And it was really dark out.”

He said it took him a few seconds to realize what was going on.

“A few minutes later, my dogs started barking,” Tom recounted.

“Then I started getting a little worried.

It was pretty scary.”

The tornado was on a steep incline.

Tom said the house had to be evacuated to a safe location and he was wearing a mask when he got there.

But it was only after he went outside that he noticed the tornado was moving away from the house.

He then took shelter under a tree and waited for more of the tornado to pass.

Tom told his friends that they could take a ride with his family in the back of his car.

“As soon as I got home, I ran out the back and ran back,” Tom explained.

“We had a good ride.”

Tom’s son, whose father was in town to help him and his two kids, was also in the home at the time.

“They were like, ‘Get your stuff, Tom, because you can’t take the kids with you,'” he recalled.

“I got the kids and took my wife out of there,” Tom continued.

“But it was pretty dangerous.”

The house was destroyed, but the tornado passed, and Tom and his family were able to get out of harm’s way.

Tom, his wife and son left their cars and started walking to the front door.

“Right there, my house was gone,” Tom, now 54, said.

The tornado that ripped through Conroe left a trail of destruction in its wake.

The city of Converse was torn down, and residents were forced to move to other parts of town.

The damaged homes were gutted and rebuilt, and some were rebuilt to house new residents.

Conroe was among Texas’ most economically distressed cities in 2015.

The Texas Department of Transportation estimated the tornado cost the town $20 million in lost property and $1.6 million in direct damages.

Conroe’s mayor, John P. Denton, called the tornado a “disaster” and a “tremendous loss.”

“The loss of our downtown, the loss of Connecro and the destruction to our community is an absolute tragedy,” Denton said.

But, the mayor said, the city was “not in a position to speculate on the nature of what will happen in the future.”

Denton said that Conroe would soon get a new paint booth, and he said that the